What Will Be The Distribution Of Radioactivity In The Dna Of The Bacteria In Each Sample

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How is the radioactivity distributed in the DNA of the bacteria in each sample?

What will be the distribution of radioactivity in the DNA of the bacteria in each sample? … After two rounds of replication in the 32P-containing medium 50% of the DNA molecules will have 32P in both strands while the remaining 50% will contain 32P in one strand and nonradioactive phosphorous in the other strand.

What is the function of each DNA polymerase in bacterial cells?

In bacterial cells the DNA polymerase I is responsible for repair while in Eukaryotes the DNA polymerase beta and epsilon are responsible for repair.

What would be the most likely effect of a large deletion in the gene that encodes the RNA part of telomerase and how would the function of telomerase be affected?

What would be the most likely effect of a large deletion in the gene that encodes the RNA part of telomerase? … Telomerase would lose the function of its internal template and would be unable to correctly associate with telomeres and synthesize new telomeric DNA.

What is meant by semi-conservative mode of DNA replication?

Semiconservative replication describes the mechanism of DNA replication in all known cells. … This process is known as semi-conservative replication because two copies of the original DNA molecule are produced each copy conserving (replicating) the information from one half of the original DNA molecule.

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Why is primase required for DNA replication?

It is critical that primers are synthesized by primase before DNA replication can occur. This is because the enzymes that synthesize DNA which are called DNA polymerases can only attach new DNA nucleotides to an existing strand of nucleotides. Therefore primase serves to prime and lay a foundation for DNA synthesis.

Why is primase required for DNA replication quizlet?

The primase enzyme uses the original DNA sequence as a template to synthesize a short RNA primer. Primers are necessary because DNA polymerase can only extend a nucleotide chain not start one. DNA polymerase begins to synthesize a new DNA strand by extending an RNA primer in the 5′ to 3′ direction.

How do DNA polymerase I and DNA polymerase III differ?

The main difference between DNA polymerase 1 and 3 is that DNA polymerase 1 is involved in the removal of primers from the fragments and replacing the gap by relevant nucleotides whereas DNA polymerase 3 is mainly involved in the synthesis of the leading and lagging strands.

How does DNA polymerase bind to DNA?

Since DNA polymerase requires a free 3′ OH group for initiation of synthesis it can synthesize in only one direction by extending the 3′ end of the preexisting nucleotide chain. Hence DNA polymerase moves along the template strand in a 3′-5′ direction and the daughter strand is formed in a 5′-3′ direction.

What is the function of the DNA polymerase enzyme?

DNA polymerase (DNAP) is a type of enzyme that is responsible for forming new copies of DNA in the form of nucleic acid molecules.

What would the effect be on DNA replication of a mutation that destroyed the 5 to 3 exonuclease activity of DNA polymerase I Please select all options that apply?

What would be the effect on DNA replication of a mutation that destroyed the 5′ to 3′ exonuclease activity in DNA polymerase I? RNA primers could not be removed from the DNA during replication.

What would be the most likely effect of inactivating the gene that encodes the RNA part of telomerase?

If the gene encoding this RNA will be inactivated then the activity of telomerase will be lost and telomeres formed will be a few. … So inactivation of genes coding telomerase RNA can produce conditions of many diseases and disorders.

How do the telomere lengths of parents with DKC?

Parents on average have longer telomeres than their children. … Children with DKC inherit shorter than average telomeres to begin with and subsequently the normal shortening of telomeres during replication would result in even shorter telomeres at an earlier gage.

How did Meselson and Stahl prove that replication of DNA is semi-conservative?

Meselson & Stahl reasoned that these experiments showed that DNA replication was semi-conservative: the DNA strands separate and each makes a copy of itself so that each daughter molecule comprises one “old” and one “new” strand.

What do you mean by semi-conservative nature of DNA replication who proved it and how?

Watson and Crick in 1953 proposed a scheme that DNA replication was semi-conservative. According to the scheme the two parental strands separate and each strand acts as a template for synthesising a complementary strand over it. … coli to prove that DNA replication is semi-conservative.

Why DNA replication is called semi-conservative?

DNA replication: A complex process whereby the ‘parent’ strands of DNA in the double helix are separated and each one is copied to produce a new (daughter) strand. This process is said to be ‘semiconservative’ because one strand from each parent is conserved and remains intact after replication has taken place.

What bases will be added to the primer as DNA replication proceeds?

The new DNA strand is synthesized in the 5’—>3′ direction the template strand is read in the 3’—>5′ direction. … What bases will be added to the primer as DNA replication proceeds? The bases should appear in the new strand in the order that they will be added starting at the 3′ end of the primer.

What does RNA primer do?

Each primer is a short piece of RNA that is complementary to the original strand of DNA. Without a primer DNA polymerase cannot copy the DNA. In short RNA primers serve as a start site for DNA polymerase when DNA needs to be copied.

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What does RNA polymerase do?

RNA polymerase is an enzyme that is responsible for copying a DNA sequence into an RNA sequence duyring the process of transcription.

How does DNA polymerase extend the primers into a new DNA strand?

Primase synthesizes RNA primers complementary to the DNA strand. DNA polymerase III extends the primers adding on to the 3′ end to make the bulk of the new DNA. RNA primers are removed and replaced with DNA by DNA polymerase I. The gaps between DNA fragments are sealed by DNA ligase.

Why is a Primase required for DNA replication instead of just using DNA polymerase quizlet?

Primase is used instead of just using a DNA polymerase because DNA polymerase need a free 3′ -OH to perform DNA synthesis and Primase provides a 3′ -OH. … two adjacent thymines become covalently linked and if left unrepaired both DNA replication and transcription are stalled at this point.

Which does DNA polymerization by DNA polymerase require?

DNA polymerases add nucleotides to the 3′ end of a polynucleotide chain. … To initiate this reaction DNA polymerases require a primer with a free 3′-hydroxyl group already base-paired to the template. They cannot start from scratch by adding nucleotides to a free single-stranded DNA template.

What does DNA polymerase III do in DNA replication?

The main function of the third polymerase Pol III is duplication of the chromosomal DNA while other DNA polymerases are involved mostly in DNA repair and translesion DNA synthesis. Together with a DNA helicase and a primase Pol III HE participates in the replicative apparatus that acts at the replication fork.

What’s the difference between DNA polymerase 1 and 2?

DNA polymerase 1 2 and 3 are prokaryotic DNA polymerases involved in DNA replication. Pol 1 catalyzes the repairing of DNA damages. Pol 2 catalyzes the fidelity and processivity of DNA replication. Pol 3 catalyzes the 5′ to 3′ DNA polymerization.

What does it mean to say that extension by DNA polymerase III proceeds 5 ‘- 3?

What does it mean to say that extension by DNA polymerase III proceeds 5 to 3? DNA polymerase attaches to 3′ end of an Okazaki fragment. As it moves in 5′ to 3′ direction it removes the RNA primer ahead of it and replaces the ribonucleotides with deoxyribonucleotides.

Is DNA polymerase involved in DNA replication?

The central enzyme involved is DNA polymerase which catalyzes the joining of deoxyribonucleoside 5′-triphosphates (dNTPs) to form the growing DNA chain. However DNA replication is much more complex than a single enzymatic reaction.

What bonds does DNA polymerase form?

As the new nucleotides line up opposite each parent strand by hydrogen bonding enzymes called DNA polymerases join the nucleotides by way of phosphodiester bonds.

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How does DNA polymerase work?

DNA polymerase works by sliding along the single strand template of DNA reading its nucleotide bases as it goes along and inserting new complementary nucleotides into the primer so as to make a sequence complementary to the template. DNA polymerase is thought to be able to replicate 749 nucleotides per second.

Where does DNA polymerase come from?

Either the individual proteins or the protein complex(es) that assemble to form the active DNA polymerase which acts in the nucleus must enter the nucleus. 4. *When*: It is likely that DNA polymerases are synthesized shortly (minutes to hours) before they are used.

What does DNA polymerase epsilon do?

In addition to its role in DNA replication DNA polymerase epsilon fulfils roles in the DNA synthesis step of nucleotide excision and base excision repair and has been implicated in recombinational processes in the cell.

What are the 2 roles of DNA polymerase in DNA replication?

DNA polymerase creates two new strands that are identical to those that already exist. DNA polymerase adds nucleotides to the three prime end of a DNA strand one nucleotide at a time.

What will be the distribution of radioactivity in the DNA of the bacteria in each sample quizlet?

What will be the distribution of radioactivity in the DNA of the bacteria in each sample? … After two rounds of replication in the 32P-containing medium 50% of the DNA molecules will have 32P in both strands while the remaining 50% will contain 32P in one strand and nonradioactive phosphorous in the other strand.

What would be the effect on DNA replication If the 5 to 3 polymerase activity of DNA polymerase I was nonfunctional?

If the activity is nonfunctional then the fidelity of replication by DNA polymerase I will decrease resulting in more misincorporated bases in the DNA. Loss of the 5′ –> 3′ exonuclease activity would result in the RNA primers used to initiate replication not being removed by DNA polymerase I.

What is the primary function of DNA polymerase I in bacterial cells quizlet?

Only DNA polymerase I has 5′-to-3′ exonuclease activity. What is(are) the primary function(s) of DNA polymerase I in bacterial cells? A. It replaces RNA primers with DNA and proofreads.

What would be the most likely effect of a large deletion in the gene that encodes?

What would be the most likely effect of a large deletion in the gene that encodes the RNA part of telomerase? … Telomerase would lose the function of its internal template and would be unable to correctly associate with telomeres and synthesize new telomeric DNA.

How Radiation Changes Your DNA

Using radioactive drugs to see inside your body – Pedro Brugarolas

Figure 5.11 Nonradioactive probes

DNA Probe Labelling | Radioactive Probe Labelling | Non Radioactive Probe Labelling | End Labelling

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